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Heat Pumps FAQ

Heat Pumps FAQ

Air Source Heat Pumps

An Air Source Heat Pump is based on the principal of heat transfer. Heat transfer uses a small amount of energy to transfer low grade heat from the air to high grade heat, suitable for heating water to high temperatures – essentially transferring heat from a ‘free heat source’ like the air to a ‘heat sink’ like your home. This is a similar operation to a refrigerator – but in reverse. It uses a process known as the vapour compression cycle.

Heat pumps have been used to provide domestic heating and hot water in Scandinavia for over 50 years, during which time constant developments and advancements have ensured that the technology is tried and tested.

Manufacturer’s life expectancy of an ASHP system is more than 20 years and there are minimal maintenance requirements. Annual servicing can be as little as £150 per annum and warranties can be as long as 7 years giving you total peace of mind.

ASHP technology can extract heat from the air even when the temperature is as low as -15c and uses electricity to increase heat as and when required, meaning that you will always be warm and comfortable whilst positively contributing to climate change.

Mitsubishi’s New Ultra Quiet Ecodan takes Air Source Heat Pumps to the next level, offering superb style, market leading energy efficiency and sound levels. Designed especially for residential applications the 8.5kW and 11.2kW units are 3 times quieter than previous models, with a sound pressure level similar to a library at 45dB(A).

Installation of an Air Source Heat Pump is considered to be permitted development, therefore no planning permission is required, provided that certain criteria is met, please see HERE for more information about planning consent.

Ground Source Heat Pumps

The Benefits

One of the main benefits of heat pumps is that they are extremely efficient, require very little maintenance and a manufacturer’s confirmed life expectancy of 20 years means ground source heat pumps are quiet and efficient with very few maintenance requirements. Ground source heat pumps can be installed in existing properties as well as larger homes, new builds and business/community premises and provide heating and hot water throughout the year.

 

How Does It Work?

A Ground Source Heat Pump is based on the principle of heat transfer. Heat transfer uses a small amount of energy to transfer low grade heat from the air to high grade heat, suitable for heating water to high temperatures – essentially transferring heat from a ‘free heat source’ like the air to a ‘heat sink’ like your home. This is a similar operation to a refrigerator – but in reverse and it uses a process known as the vapour compression cycle.

 

Coefficient of Performance (COP)

Coefficient of performance (COP) for a heat pump is defined as the useful heat energy output divided by the electrical energy consumed. Another way to look at this is how many kW of heat are produced by inputting 1kW of electricity into a heat pump.

The average COP for a Ground Source Heat Pump, over a full year is roughly 3.75, i.e. an efficiency of 375%, compared to an 10 year old oil boiler, where efficiency could be assumed at 85%.

To produce meaningful figures and usage estimates, we use geographical weather data specific to your location. We also assess your property via approved heat loss calculations, considering the specifics of your building such as the number of external walls and the level of insulation currently installed.

 

Life-cycle of a Heat Pump

Benefits of installing a Ground Source Heat Pump system continue beyond the 7 years of the subsidies from the Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme.

One of the major benefits of opting for a renewable source such as a heat pump is that the financial benefit extends long beyond the duration of the Renewable Heat Incentive. A well-maintained heat pump is expected to have a lifetime of up to 20 years when installed and serviced properly by a leading renewables installer such as Cotswold Energy Group.

Research suggests that traditional fossil fuel boilers (such as gas and oil) have an average lifespan of 12 years, meaning that in the lifetime of your new renewable heat pump you will benefit from:

  • 7 years of RHI payments from the UK Government (20 years if non-domestic).
  • A system that (if maintained) will be expected to last for 20 years.
  • Saving the cost of at least one fossil fuel boiler replacement.
  • Cutting your personal carbon emissions.
  • Contributing positively to climate change.
Ground Source Heat Pump

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